Shepton Beauchamp

In the heart of Cider Country

User Tools

Site Tools


church:vicars_letters:may2008

Joyful Times - Sad Times

By Fr. Geoff

In the churches and parishes we have had a really good time this past month or so. Mothering and Palm Sundays, and Easter day were really joyful occasions, with busy services full of life and fun.

The school holidays were separate from Easter, so for the first time we were able to do much more with the children about Holy Week and the events leading up to the Crucifixion and Resurrection; at Shepton Beauchamp, the children re-enacted the events each day with Joan Kennedy and had a wonderful time!

At Ottersey – the redundant church on a hill above Stocklinch – following one of the worse storms of the winter, the dawn brought with it a glorious spring day, with a light fresh breeze and warm sunshine: this little church was full of people who strode up the hill, left their wellies in the porch and joined in a really lovely service, which was all the better because of the people gathered there and the attitude of joyful springtime that they had brought with them (or perhaps found there?!?!?). Joy brought from sadness of death and storm.

In recent years our farming community has been badly hit by the deaths of some of its most well-known, and much loved characters. Amidst the joy of Easter came the sad news of the death of Robert England after a long and brave battle with cancer.

His funeral service was conducted privately at Taunton crematorium and followed by a service of thanksgiving for his life. This was one of the biggest turn-outs I have ever seen, there being well over three hundred people in church. Memories of his life were shared and amidst the sorrow of parting there were smiles and laughter at the character that was Robert.

Somehow this tribute to him helped lift the atmosphere and turn it into a real celebration of his short but full life, and of all that he did, all whose lives he touched, whose love he shared. Joy and sadness together.

Thefts from Churches

Thieves are moving steadily across the country searching for metal of any kind to steal. In the past weeks thieves have struck churches in Crewkerne and Ilminster, stealing lead from the roof and causing a huge amount of damage. THIS IS A VERY REAL THREAT, please keep an eye on our little churches if you see anyone “working” on them they are probably stealing … call the Police (999), Vicar or Wardens – but tell someone FAST!

Please be extra vigilant around our churches

The only work being done on any of our churches is at Stocklinch (St Mary Magdalen) where there is lime-washing inside the church early in May

Written by Children

Marriage and Relationships

WHAT DO MOST PEOPLE DO ON A DATE?

1. Dates are for having fun, and people should use them to get to know each other. Even boys have something to say if you listen long enough. – Lynn, age 8 (isn't she a treasure?)

2. On the first date, they just tell each other lies and that usually gets them interested enough to go for a second date. – Martin, age 10 (isn't he ready for the world of dating?)

WHAT WOULD YOU DO ON A FIRST DATE THAT WAS TURNING SOUR? I'd run home and play dead. The next day I would call all the newspapers and make sure they wrote about me in all the dead columns. – Craig, age 9

WHEN IS IT OKAY TO KISS SOMEONE? 1. When they're rich. – Pam, age 7

2. The law says you have to be eighteen, so I wouldn't want to mess with that. – Curt, age 7

Maybe - by Rob Allen

  1. Maybe . . We were supposed to meet the wrong people before meeting the right one so that, when we finally meet the right person, we will know how to be grateful for that gift.
  2. Maybe . . . When the door of happiness closes, another opens; but, often we look so long at the closed door that we don't even see the new one which has been opened for us.
  3. Maybe . . . It is true that we don't know what we have until we lose it, but it is also true that we don't know what we have been missing until it arrives.
  4. Maybe . . . The happiest of people don't necessarily have the best of everything; they just make the most of everything that comes their way.
  5. Maybe . . . The brightest future will always be based on a forgotten past; after all, you can't go on successfully in life until you let go of your past mistakes, failures and heartaches
  6. Maybe . . . The best kind of friend is the kind you can sit with, never say a word, and then walk away feeling like it was the best conversation you've ever had.
  7. Maybe . . You should put yourself in others' shoes. If you feel that something could hurt you, it probably will hurt the other person, too.

From the Church Registers

29th March: Corey Lee Hill, baptized at Shepton Beauchamp

31st March: Robert England, service of Thanksgiving at South Petherton following cremation at Taunton)

1st April: Archie Lawrence, funeral and burial at Barrington

Conversation with the Bishops

St. Mary’s Church, Chard with both Bishops on Tuesday 13th May 6.30pm for 7.00pm. This is for everyone – wardens, officers, PCC members and members of all the congregations. The format will comprise presentations by both Bishops with time to reflect and discuss each one.

The Conversation will be followed by Compline with hymns. Please do encourage as many people as possible to attend what will surely be an interesting and thought-provoking evening, as well as the chance to get to know your Bishops a little better.

Evensongs for the Deanery

Members of the Deanery are especially invited to the Evensongs listed below. These are in place of the usual Deanery Evensong Service held in the summer.

Sunday 18th May St. Andrew’s Dowlish Wake 6.30pm
Sunday 22nd June St. Andrew’s West Hatch 6.30pm
Sunday 20th July Forde Abbey 3.00pm
Sunday 24th August St. Nicholas Corfe 6.30pm

Dowlish Wake - Music by The Lake

Speke Hall Dowlish Wake

The Bristol String Quartet

Sunday 1st June 2008 12 noon - 4 pm

Tickets may be purchased from Liz Perry 01460 54156 or Duncan Rigby 01460 52311

church/vicars_letters/may2008.txt · Last modified: d/m/Y H:M (external edit)