Shepton Beauchamp

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 +====== The Little Match Seller ======
 + – An old year’s story  // 
 + by **Hans Christian Anderson**// ​  
 + It was terribly cold and nearly dark on the last evening of the old year, and the snow was falling fast. In the cold and the darkness, a poor little girl, with bare head and naked feet, roamed through the streets. It is true she had on a pair of slippers when she left home, but they were not of much use. They were very large, so large, indeed, that they had belonged to her mother, and the poor little creature had lost them in running across the street to avoid two carriages that were rolling along at a terrible rate. 
 +
 +One of the slippers she could not find, and a boy seized upon the other and ran away with it, saying that he could use it as a cradle, when he had children of his own. So the little girl went on with her little naked feet, which were quite red and blue with the cold. 
 +
 +In an old apron she carried a number of matches, and had a bundle of them in her hands. No one had bought anything of her the whole day, nor had anyone given her even a penny. Shivering with cold and hunger, she crept along; poor little child, she looked the picture of misery. The snowflakes fell on her long, fair hair, which hung in curls on her shoulders, but she regarded them not. 
 +
 +Lights were shining from every window, and there was a savoury smell of roast goose, for it was New-year'​s eve—yes, she remembered that. In a corner, between two houses, one of which projected beyond the other, she sank down and huddled herself together. She had drawn her little feet under her, but she could not keep off the cold; and she dared not go home, for she had sold no matches, and could not take home even a penny of money. Her father would certainly beat her; besides, it was almost as cold at home as here, for they had only the roof to cover them, through which the wind howled, although the largest holes had been stopped up with straw and rags. 
 +
 +Her little hands were almost frozen with the cold. Ah! perhaps a burning match might be some good, if she could draw it from the bundle and strike it against the wall, just to warm her fingers. She drew one out—“scratch!” how it sputtered as it burnt! It gave a warm, bright light, like a little candle, as she held her hand over it. It was really a wonderful light. It seemed to the little girl that she was sitting by a large iron stove, with polished brass feet and a brass ornament. How the fire burned! and seemed so beautifully warm that the child stretched out her feet as if to warm them, when, lo! the flame of the match went out, the stove vanished, and she had only the remains of the half-burnt match in her hand. 
 +
 +She rubbed another match on the wall. It burst into a flame, and where its light fell upon the wall it became as transparent as a veil, and she could see into the room. The table was covered with a snowy white table-cloth,​ on which stood a splendid dinner service, and a steaming roast goose, stuffed with apples and dried plums. And what was still more wonderful, the goose jumped down from the dish and waddled across the floor, with a knife and fork in its breast, to the little girl. Then the match went out, and there remained nothing but the thick, damp, cold wall before her. 
 +
 +She lighted another match, and then she found herself sitting under a beautiful Christmas-tree. It was larger and more beautifully decorated than the one which she had seen through the glass door at the rich merchant'​s. Thousands of tapers were burning upon the green branches, and coloured pictures, like those she had seen in the show-windows,​ looked down upon it all. The little one stretched out her hand towards them, and the match went out. 
 +
 +The Christmas lights rose higher and higher, till they looked to her like the stars in the sky. Then she saw a star fall, leaving behind it a bright streak of fire. “Someone is dying,” thought the little girl, for her old grandmother,​ the only one who had ever loved her, and who was now dead, had told her that when a star falls, ​ a soul was going up to God. 
 +
 +She again rubbed a match on the wall, and the light shone round her; in the brightness stood her old grandmother,​ clear and shining, yet mild and loving in her appearance. “Grandmother,​” cried the little one, “O take me with you; I know you will go away when the match burns out; you will vanish like the warm stove, the roast goose, and the large, glorious Christmas-tree.” And she made haste to light the whole bundle of matches, for she wished to keep her grandmother there. And the matches glowed with a light that was brighter than the noon-day, and her grandmother had never appeared so large or so beautiful. She took the little girl in her arms, and they both flew upwards in brightness and joy far above the earth, where there was neither cold nor hunger nor pain, for they were with God. 
 +
 +In the dawn of morning there lay the poor little one, with pale cheeks and smiling mouth, leaning against the wall; she had been frozen to death on the last evening of the year; and the New-year'​s sun rose and shone upon a little corpse! The child still sat, in the stiffness of death, holding the matches in her hand, one bundle of which was burnt. “She tried to warm herself,” said some. No one imagined what beautiful things she had seen, nor into what glory she had entered with her grandmother,​ on New-year'​s day.
 +
 +===== From the Church Registers =====
 +
 +
 +|3rd November |David Wilson|Ashes interred at Shepton Beauchamp |
 +|22nd November |David Bulgin| Burial at Kingstone following funeral service at the Minster|
 +|30th November |Michael Brett 78 yrs|Cremation at Yeovil followed by service of Thanksgiving at Puckington|
 +|17th December|Margaret Morgan|Ashes interred at Dowlish|
 +
 +
 +===== Why Teachers Drink =====
 +
 +**Taken from real test paper answers)**
 +
 +**History** - In wartime children who lived in big cities had to be evaporated because it was safer in the country.
 +
 +**Maths** - The total is when you add up all the numbers and a remainder is an animal that pulls santa on his slay.
 +
 +**History** - Sometimes in the war they take prisoners and keep them as ostriges until the war is over.   Some prisoners end up in consterpation camps.
 +
 +**RE** - I asked my mum why we said old men at the end of prayers at school, I don’t know any old men apart from grandpa.
 +
 +**Maths** - I would like to be an accountant but you have to know a lot about maths.
 +
 +**Geography** - The closest town to France is Dover. ​  You can get to France on a train or you can go on a fairy.
 +
 +**Maths** - If it is less than 90 degrees it is a cute angel.
 +
 +**The Arts** - In last year’s Christmas concert, Linzi played the main prat.   I played one of the smaller prats and I would like to have a bigger prat this year.
 +
 +**Science** - Helicopters are cleverer than planes. ​  Not only can they fly through the air they can also hoover.
 +
 +**Natural History** - Crabs and creatures like them all belong to a family of crushed asians.
 +
 +**Geography** - In geography we learned that countries with sea round them are islands and ones without sea are incontinents.
 +
 +**RE** - If you marry two people you are a pigamist, but morons are allowed to do this.
 +
  
church/vicars_letters/jan2013mag.txt · Last modified: d/m/Y H:M (external edit)